iedb

Adespota skylia

- Everyone Has a Breaking Point
Adespota skylia
Adespota skylia Rating: 52 out of 100 based on 44 reviews.

Los Angeles scriptwriter David Sumner (James Marsden) and his wife, TV actress Amy Sumner (Kate Bosworth), move to Blackwater, Mississippi, where Amy grew up, to rebuild Amy's recently deceased father's house, and so that David can finish a script. David meets Amy's ex-boyfriend Charlie Venner (Alexander Skarsgård) and his friends Norman (Rhys Coiro), Chris (Billy Lush) and Bic (Drew Powell), whom he hires to fix the house's roof, which was recently badly damaged by a hurricane. David also meets former football coach Tom Heddon (James Woods), whose 15-year-old daughter Janice (Willa Holland) is attracted to a local mentally handicapped man, Jeremy Niles (Dominic Purcell), who lives with his brother Daniel (Walton Goggins). Heddon often bullies Jeremy, who may have committed a crime in the past, and believes Jeremy is stalking his daughter.

Charlie and his friends begin taunting David, who is initially condescending to their customs. The taunting escalates into harassment as they make crude remarks towards Amy and play loud music to annoy David and prevent him from working on his screenplay. They break into the house and strangle the couple's cat while they are at a social gathering. David is hesitant to confront the men about the cat's death without evidence of their involvement, so Amy does it. Shortly thereafter, while David is away hunting with the men, Charlie breaks into the house and rapes Amy. While she is recovering, Norman appears and rapes her as well.

David returns, having been abandoned in the woods by the men, but Amy doesn't tell him about the rape. David fires the men the following day. At Amy's insistence, they go to a local football game, where Amy and Charlie meet. Meanwhile, Janice takes Jeremy to an empty locker area and attempts to give him oral sex. Heddon notices her absence and begins looking for her. Jeremy, scared of Heddon, puts his hand over Janice's mouth to silence her, accidentally smothering her to death. He runs away just as Heddon informs Charlie and his friends of Janice's disappearance and deduces that Jeremy has done something to her.

Amy becomes uncomfortable with Charlie and asks David to take her home. On the way, she tells him she wants to return to Los Angeles, surprising him and causing him to accidentally run over Jeremy. David and Amy take him to their home and call Sheriff John Burke (Laz Alonso). Heddon finds out and goes to David and Amy's house with Charlie, Norman, Chris and Bic. Heddon confronts David, but David says he will only turn Jeremy over to the state authorities. Frustrated, Heddon kills Burke and then attempts to enter the house. David then takes Amy and Jeremy to the bedroom and prepares to fight off the men.

Chris attempts to break into the house through a window, so David nails his hand to the wall with a nail gun, then tells him he hopes the glass slits his throat. When Heddon tries to follow, David burns his face with boiling vegetable oil. Heddon and Charlie decide to ram one of the house's walls with Charlie's pick-up truck. They succeed, but Charlie is momentarily knocked unconscious. Meanwhile, David overpowers Heddon, causing Heddon to accidentally shoot his own foot. David then takes the opportunity to shoot Heddon in the chest, killing him. He then beats Bic to death with a fireplace poker. Upstairs, Amy and Jeremy are attacked by Norman who has climbed through a window with a ladder. Norman is preparing to rape Amy again when David and Charlie appear. Charlie and Norman turn on David, giving Amy the opportunity to shoot Norman with Charlie's shotgun, killing him. David and Charlie fight, and Charlie overpowers David. As he prepares to kill him, Amy aims on Charlie with his shotgun. Charlie says that it is out of shells but the distraction gives David the opportunity to kill him by ensnaring his head with a bear trap. Amy is traumatized as she sees Charlie's head. David, covered in blood, looks at her in recognition before he walks away. As sirens approach, David looks at the burning barn, announcing that he "got them all".

Cast
James Marsden

David Sumner
Kate Bosworth

Amy Sumner
James Woods

Tom Heddon
Dominic Purcell

Jeremy Niles
Laz Alonso

John Burke
Willa Holland

Janice Heddon
Walton Goggins

Daniel Niles
Anson Mount

Coach Milkens
Jessica Dockrey

Helen (as Jessica Cook)
Production
Director:Rod Lurie
Producer:Gilbert Dumontet (executive producer)
George Flynn (associate producer)
Marc Frydman (producer)
Beau Marks (executive producer)
Writer:Sam Peckinpah (earlier screenplay)
David Zelag Goodman (earlier screenplay) and)
Gordon Williams (novel "The Siege of Trencher's Farm")
Rod Lurie (screenplay)
Reviews for Adespota skylia
Movies.com
How to remake a classic film and strip it of all meaning: Step 1: Instead of letting your characters' actions speak for them, explain everything in the dialogue. Make sure people are yelling. In 1971's classic, influential Straw Dogs, the story of ...
Screen Jabber
This anaemic remake of the Sam Peckinpah classic is really not worth your time. See the original again instead – it's so much better. The unsettling atmosphere of cold Cornwall has now been transplanted to the very sunny and far less intimidating
Fan The Fire
A surprisingly solid remake, Rod Lurie’s Straw Dogs retains Sam Peckinpah’s dark vision of masculinity, even if it fails to reproduce the ambiguities and atmosphere of the original. Transposed from 1970s Cornwall to the Deep South...
Read review4 Nov 2011
Screen Rant
Straw Dogs is a mess of a film that does little more than rely on graphic violence as well as outdated stereotypes to keep the tension high. As previously alluded to, the original Straw Dogs storyline offered a much more compelling setup...
Read review16 Sep 2011
Scotsman.com
Unfortunately, such things only get the film so far and, as Straw Dogs works towards its atavistic conclusion, Lurie moves into annoyingly prescriptive Michael Haneke territory, scolding us for craving violent entertainment while serving up exactly that.
Read review7 Nov 2011
Reviews for Adespota skylia
Movies.com
How to remake a classic film and strip it of all meaning: Step 1: Instead of letting your characters' actions speak for them, explain everything in the dialogue. Make sure people are yelling. In 1971's classic, influential Straw Dogs, the story of ...
Screen Jabber
This anaemic remake of the Sam Peckinpah classic is really not worth your time. See the original again instead – it's so much better. The unsettling atmosphere of cold Cornwall has now been transplanted to the very sunny and far less intimidating
Fan The Fire
A surprisingly solid remake, Rod Lurie’s Straw Dogs retains Sam Peckinpah’s dark vision of masculinity, even if it fails to reproduce the ambiguities and atmosphere of the original. Transposed from 1970s Cornwall to the Deep South...
Read review4 Nov 2011
Screen Rant
Straw Dogs is a mess of a film that does little more than rely on graphic violence as well as outdated stereotypes to keep the tension high. As previously alluded to, the original Straw Dogs storyline offered a much more compelling setup...
Read review16 Sep 2011
Scotsman.com
Unfortunately, such things only get the film so far and, as Straw Dogs works towards its atavistic conclusion, Lurie moves into annoyingly prescriptive Michael Haneke territory, scolding us for craving violent entertainment while serving up exactly that.
Read review7 Nov 2011
Sacramento News & Review
Bookish screenwriter David Sumner (James Marsden) moves with his wife Amy (Kate Bosworth) to her rural hometown, where the local good ol’ boys leer at her and sneer at him...
Read review22 Sep 2011
Cole Smithey
The only reason a filmmaker should ever attempt remake to make a film is to improve on the original. David Cronenberg performed just such a feat with his version of “The Fly.”
Read review18 Sep 2011
FirstShowing.net
That's when the subtext is lost, but, even still, you could have an exciting film on your hands. Rod Lurie's new take on Straw Dogs can't even get that right.
Read review16 Sep 2011
TV Guide
Director Rod Lurie’s previous claim to fame before he became a filmmaker was his controversial career as a film critic, which makes sense given his blatant lack of understanding of Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs.
The Baltimore Sun
Writer-director Rod Lurie's bird-brained remake of "Straw Dogs" doesn't work on its own terms, and it can't hold a candle to the unruly, unstable merits of Sam Peckinpah's 1971 original.
Read review15 Sep 2011
Boxoffice Magazine
At once doggedly faithful and yet soft around the edges, Straw Dogs hews closely to the template of Sam Peckinpah's incendiary 1971 film while finding subtle, significant ways to make its controversial material more palatable.
Read review16 Sep 2011
RopeofSilicon.com
There is one major flaw when it comes to Rod Lurie's remake of Sam Peckinpah's Straw Dogs and that's the lack of having a message or reason for telling such a violent and savage story.
Read review16 Sep 2011
NorthShoreMovies.net
Writer-director Rod Lurie is a film critic-turned-director who has made a number of overheated films (“The Contender,” “Resurrecting The Champ,” “The Last Castle”) that present themselves as addressing important issues, but invariably fall sho
Read review16 Sep 2011
New York Post
'Straw Dogs" is one of those movies that sits in an armchair, smokes a pipe and reflects "seriously" on "the question of violence," but the main reason to see it is for the hilariously nasty uses it devises for a bear trap, nail gun, etc.
Read review16 Sep 2011
azcentral.com
The setting has been moved from the British countryside to the swamps of Mississippi, and the lead actors got better looking, but Rod Lurie's "Straw Dogs" is essentially identical to the 1971 Sam Peckinpah thriller he's remaking.
Read review15 Sep 2011
IGN
Rod Lurie's remake of Peckinpah's movie is different, but not better.
Writer-Director Rod Lurie's remake of Sam Peckinpah's Straw Dogs is different from the original, but not necessarily better. It's a remake that exists only to cash-in on a library title's name recognition and exploitable premise.
Read review16 Sep 2011
EFilmCritic.com
If one is going to be crazy or foolhardy enough to go out and remake a well-known film--especially one that tends to be regard in cinematic circles as some kind of classic or another--
Read review16 Sep 2011
Movie Line
This new version of Straw Dogs, written and directed by Rod Lurie (of Resurrecting the Champ and The Contender), has been contemporized, sanitized and stripped of all complexity, and what’s left is as empty as a used piñata.
Read review15 Sep 2011
Rolling Stone
Audiences for this incendiary button-pusher will mostly divide along two lines: those who think writer-director Rod Lurie (The Contender, Nothing but the Truth)
Read review15 Sep 2011
Miami Herald
Director Rod Lurie's redo of the 1971 Sam Peckinpah classic gives remakes a good name.
Read review14 Sep 2011
Reel Views
Sam Peckinpah's 1971 adaptation of Gordon Williams' novel elicited more controversy than the uncompromising director expected, in large part because of the unfl.5inching and somewhat ambiguous depiction of a double rape.
Read review17 Sep 2011
Slant Magazine
The fissure between faithful, respectful monument and soulless, hot-shit modernization/transplant also paints Rod Lurie, fatally, into a corner.
Read review15 Sep 2011
Jackie K. Cooper
The James Marsden/Kate Bosworth film “Straw Dogs” is a re-make of a 1971 movie of the same name that starred Dustin Hoffman and Susan George. The original film was directed by Sam Peckinpah and in some circles is regarded as a minor classic.
iHaveNet.com
A glorified home invasion thriller is still a home invasion thriller. And Straw Dogs, despite intentions as a meditation on our capacity for violence, remains just that.
Read review15 Sep 2011
Time Out New York
What in the Sam Peckinpah Hill is this?!? Rod Lurie’s remake of the controversial 1971 rape-revenger not called A Clockwork Orange lies there like the dying deer gunned down by a group of Mississippi hicks in the precredits sequence.
The Austin Chronicle
Rod Lurie remakes Sam Peckinpah's 1971 bloodbath-classic about a home invasion and tapping into man's inner rage monster.
Read review23 Sep 2011
Chicago Sun-Times
A reasonably close retelling of the 1971 film by Sam Peckinpah. Change the location from England to Mississippi, change a mathematician into a screenwriter, keep the bear trap and the cat found strangled, and it is every bit as violent.
Read review14 Sep 1911
E! Online
Sadly, big-name vampires and superheroes like Alexander Skarsgård, James Marsden and Kate Bosworth can't save this absolutely unnecessary remake from feeling like a forgettable Lifetime movie. A really bloody, vile Lifetime movie.
Read review15 Sep 2011
Susan Granger Entertainment Commentaries
In 1971, Sam Peckinpah stunned audiences with “Straw Dogs,” a provocative saga of violence and its consequences, starring Dustin Hoffman and Susan George.
Read review13 Sep 2011
NYDailynews.com
Like its predecessor, Rod Lurie's "Straw Dogs" is very much a movie of its moment. While Sam Peckinpah's 1971 original grappled with sexual politics in ruthless fashion, Lurie clearly has other issues to work out.
Read review16 Sep 2011
CinemaBlend.com
With a more suitable male lead and stronger subtext, Rod Lurie’s remake of Straw Dogs could have been much more.
Real.com
As close to the original as Lurie’s well-made remake is, there remains a sizeable question mark over why Straw Dogs was revisited at all. Purely to make the 1971 film’s ideas accessible to a 2011 audience seems a flimsy excuse, and it merely...
Read review1 Nov 2011
Mirror.co.uk
Most horror remakes arrive in cinemas to make a fast buck rather than attempting to build on what came before: The Amityville Horror, The Last House On The Left, A Nightmare On Elm Street.
Read review4 Nov 2011
Shadows on the Wall
This remake of Sam Peckinpah's 1971 British thriller is deeply unpleasant but very well-made. It's also bravely packed with all kinds of mixed messages that force us to think about some extremely difficult themes.
Empire
Lurie's remake doesn't bring a lot of fresh ideas to the table. The thick fug of moral ambiguity, so disconcerting in Peckinpah's film, is missing, replaced by certainties rife in modern horror. The result is a bit of yawn enlivened only by James Woods' d
Birmingham Mail
Welcome to Straw Dogs 2011, a remake of a seminal thriller first released in the UK 40 years ago yesterday. Anyone who has seen Sam Peckinpah’s controversial original will recognise the set-up immediately.
Read review4 Nov 2011
TotalFilm.com
Granted an X certificate on its 1971 cinema release and banned on video between 1988 and 2002, Sam Peckinpah’s tale of civilised man finding his inner monster to survive an assault of irrational violence featured strong rape...
Read review4 Nov 2011
National Post
According to the Tao Te Ching and helpfully explained by James Marsden in the film — a straw dog was an ancient Chinese creation, standing in for the real thing in certain ceremonies, but of no use afterward.
Read review15 Sep 2011
The Guardian UK
Chekhov said that if you have hung a pistol on the wall in the first act, then in the following one it should be fired. This remake of Straw Dogs has a horrible bear-trap being mounted on a wall in a fancy house by a bunch of rednecks...
Read review3 Nov 2011
canada.com
In any event, it's a dramatic principle that is followed with gothic precision in Straw Dogs, a drooling and redundant remake of Sam Peckinpah's controversial 1971 revenge drama.
Read review16 Sep 2011
QNetwork Entertainment
Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs (1971) was one of the most controversial films of its era
Dose.ca
A redundant remake of the 1971 landmark of violence. In this version, James Marsden and Kate Bosworth play a Hollywood screenwriter and his actress wife who move to Mississippi and upset the locals with their big-city ways and her sexual appeal.
Read review16 Sep 2011
The Telegraph
Rod Lurie has adapted Sam Peckinpah’s banned 1971 psychological thriller, Straw Dogs, with intelligence.
The original Straw Dogs is a rare example of censorship making a film more, rather than less, repulsive.
Read review3 Nov 2011
Birmingham Post
It’s 40 years today since Sam Peckinpah’s controversial thriller Straw Dogs was originally released in the UK, before being banned for release on the small screen under the Video Recordings Act 1984.
Read review2 Nov 2011
Cast
James Marsden...David Sumner
Kate Bosworth...Amy Sumner
Alexander Skarsgård...Charlie
James Woods...Tom Heddon
Dominic Purcell...Jeremy Niles
Rhys Coiro...Norman
Billy Lush...Chris
Laz Alonso...John Burke
Willa Holland...Janice Heddon
Walton Goggins...Daniel Niles
Anson Mount...Coach Milkens
Drew Powell...Bic
Kristen Shaw...Abby
Megan Adelle...Melissa
Jessica Dockrey...Helen (as Jessica Cook)
Randall Newsome...Blackie
Tim J. Smith...Larry
Kelly Holleman...Beauty Queen
Richard Folmer...Pastor
Wanetah Walmsley...Kristen
Clyde Heun...Referee
Grayson Capps...Band Member #1
Tommy MacLuckie...Band Member #2
Josh Kerin...Band Member #3
John Milham...Band Member #4
Kristin Kelly...Teenager at BBQ
Rod Lurie...Logger #1
Rick LaCour...Road Crew Supervisor (uncredited)
Charlotte Biggs...Stadium Patron (uncredited)
Jessica 'Jessie' Blake...Fan (uncredited)
Kimberly Lynn Campbell...Fan (uncredited)
Sara Kenley...Blackwater Cheerleader / Janice's Friend (uncredited)
Billy Leo...#1 Football Fan (uncredited)
Joanna Theobalds...Kelly (uncredited)
Timothy Hoffman...Football Fan (uncredited)
Jeremy Johns...Paramedic (uncredited)
Shane Tucker...Fight Guy (uncredited)
Production
Director:Rod Lurie
Producer:Gilbert Dumontet (executive producer)
George Flynn (associate producer)
Marc Frydman (producer)
Beau Marks (executive producer)
Writer:Sam Peckinpah (earlier screenplay)
David Zelag Goodman (earlier screenplay) and)
Gordon Williams (novel "The Siege of Trencher's Farm")
Rod Lurie (screenplay)
Composer:Larry Groupé
Cinematographer:Alik Sakharov
Editing:Sarah Boyd
Casting:Sharon Bialy
Sherry Thomas
Production Design:Tony Fanning
Art Director:John P. Goldsmith
Set Decorator:Kristin Bicksler
Costume Design:Lynn Falconer
Makeup:Kimberly Amacker (key makeup artist)
Gloria Belz (makeup artist)
Rose Librizzi (makeup department head)
Chrissy Morris (makeup artist)
Lotus Seki (key hair stylist)
Gary J. Tunnicliffe (makeup effects supervisor)
Amy Wood (hair stylist)
Production Management:Beau Marks (unit production manager)
Valerie Bleth Sharp (production supervisor)
United States16 Sep 2011
Canada16 Sep 2011
Sweden7 Oct 2011
India21 Oct 2011
United Kingdom4 Nov 2011
Russian Federation10 Nov 2011
Ireland4 Nov 2011
Germany1 Dec 2011
Hong Kong8 Dec 2011
Belgium4 Jan 2012
MaltaMalta23 Nov 2011
Spain16 Dec 2011
Kazakhstan10 Nov 2011
Finland0 Feb 2012
Argentina7 Feb 2012
Hungary13 Oct 2012
Brazil9 Feb 2012
Japan21 Mar 2012
Netherlands3 Apr 2012
Italy4 Apr 2012
Poland11 Apr 2012